The project saw Plus Dane convert 127 terraced properties into 99 modern affordable homes. Credit: via Plus Dane

Plus Dane completes £17m Liverpool homes 

In partnership with Liverpool City Council and Homes England, the housing association has completed the refurbishment of derelict homes in the Welsh Streets area of Toxteth. 

The project saw Plus Dane convert 127 terraced properties into 99 modern affordable homes on Pengwern Street, Gwydir Street, High Park Street and Kinmel Street. 

The mix of two-, three- and four-bedroom homes have been delivered in three phases over the last five years.  

Plus Dane chief executive Ian Reed said: “This has been an extraordinary redevelopment with many challenges along the way, so it is a proud day for us at Plus Dane to see this project completed and the difference it has made to the community. 

“We have always been committed to supporting our communities in L8 and it is fantastic to see the Welsh Streets area fulfilling the potential it has always had, to be a desirable place to live.” 

Penny Lane Builders, Markhams, and the Halsall Lloyd Partnership, have all supported Plus Dane on the scheme. 

Gerard McEvoy, director of Penny Lane Builders, said: “We know this redevelopment has been hugely important to the Welsh Streets community, and it has meant a great deal for us as a local business to play our part in restoring these homes. 

“Not only that but it has given us the chance to create apprenticeships and job opportunities for people living in the area, including Plus Dane tenants. This has brought some tremendous talent into Penny Lane Builders as well, and shows the wider benefits that regeneration and working in partnership can have in the community.” 

Elsewhere within the Welsh Streets neighbourhood, developer Placefirst has created 300 homes. 

Your Comments

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Its really great we can bring these properties up to modern standards, but I’m struggling to understand how spending over 170k per finished property equates to providing affordable housing.

By Anonymous

Add to that the cost of buying them in and rehousing displaced tenants and some owners, it does make for an expensive option, albeit a pleasing development

By Anonymous

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