Bowler's Yard Scarbrough Hat Box New Islington, February 2020

Scarborough plots final Ancoats phase

Chloé Vaughan

The developer has submitted plans for an 11-storey apartment block as the third and final scheme in New Islington at Bowler’s Yard, following Milliner’s Wharf and Hat Box.

The vacant site was previously used as a compound for the construction materials on the other neighbouring developments. Subject to approval, Scarborough will build 64 apartments and communal area on the ground floor.

This third phase of the development at Bowler’s Yard is being brought forward under FairBriar, a joint venture in which Scarborough International Properties holds a 50% stake, with Metro Holdings of Singapore and Hauling Group of China controlling 25% each.

Planning advisor Zerum said: “Manchester city centre is expanding outwards and significant investment is changing areas such as New Islington and Ancoats, which are now considered a more integrated extension of the city centre to the east.

“New residential developments have vastly improved the street scene and vibrancy of these areas, which are popular with individuals seeking to live close to Manchester city centre and the opportunities it offers. This development will further contribute to the ongoing investment in this part of the city, which is a priority area for Manchester City Council, especially in delivering residential accommodation of appropriate densities.”

Nicola Wallis, sales & marketing director at Scarborough, said: “Bowler’s Yard will be an exciting
addition to the popular residential area of New Islington.

“Scarborough has a strong commitment to Manchester and Bowler’s Yard is our fourth scheme in the city. Milliners Wharf and the Hatbox have been completed, and we are well underway with Middlewood Locks
with the first phase completed and now home to more than 650 residents and the second phase
under construction.”

The scheme was designed by architect Carey Jones Chapman Tolcher.

Bowler's Yard Hat Box And Milliner's Whard Scarborough February 2020

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Where’s the gray vomit emoji?

By Hideous

This looks really cool. I do like the idea of using all available space and this ticks the box. I also have fondness for roofs being anything but flat. I am also passionate about subterranean rail/tram projects and New Islington would ideally have a stop therefore truly integrated into the city centre. Similarly with Ardwick to the South,, Ardwick green has amazing potential. Ardwick would benefit from a large covered market hosting large flea market on a Sunday /Bank Holiday,,, outdoor music/performance spot, lots and lots of led lighting and a large pool/lido /sauna complex above and below ground and perhaps a culinary school in other words we create our own Michelin star chefs and restaurants sourcing produce from N Wales, Cheshire, The Peaks and Cumbria and finally Lancs/Yorks via the world class market and also flowers,, from these islands and the Netherlands via Hull, fish via Grimsby and Cornwall. I currently buy fish from a bloke in Halifax and the catch is driven up from Polperro at approximately 5:00am and arrives lunch time ish.

By Robert Fuller

Grim, grey, awful

By Tyler

Nice big useable balconies! That’ll be a big selling point compared to those buildings where developers have cut corners and skimped.

By Balcony watch

wow. Manchester deserves better than all these bland boxes popping up all over.

By Anonymous

not another one please

By Anonymous

Scotteh

By Anonymous

Awful design, it only has 4 parking spaces (so insufficient for disabled people with a token 2), no affordable housing, they’ve refused to plant trees to offset the environmental impact and the lack of shop that was previously promised to the residents in phase 1 and 2 of the development in favour of making more money without facilities but the developer, who also sold phase 1 (Milliner’s Wharf) with incorrectly fitted fire protection so residents are facing a £7million bill which they are ignoring all liability for. Greedy developers and poor building regulation by Manchester Council.

By Adam