London Road Fire Station
The listed former fire station is to contain offices and a 42-bed hotel

London Road Fire Station approved

Dan Whelan

Amended proposals for Allied London’s office-led mixed-use scheme in Manchester have won planning approval from the city council. 

The grade two-listed former fire station, which opened in 1906, was acquired by Allied London in 2015 from Britannia Hotels for an undisclosed sum.

Allied London won planning approval in 2017 to convert the building into a mix of uses including apartments, a hotel, workspace and other hospitality uses in a scheme designed by Levitt Bernstein. 

Work to repair and restore parts of the building’s façade had already taken place when the developer changed tack, swapping out apartments for offices and appointing Purcell as architect. 

The changes were made “in response to post-submission engagement with key project stakeholders”, the developer said at the time. 

The scheme is now office-led and the number of hotel rooms has more than halved from 91 to 42. 

The earlier scheme also planned a new-build basement with access through a distinctive glass pavilion in the courtyard, however that has now been removed in the latest proposals. 

Overall, the revised project will include a 42-bedroom hotel with its entrance on Whitworth Street, workspace “aimed specifically at creative industries”, food and beverage operators in nine historic spaces, small-scale retail units, gym and studio facilities, and the restoration of the Coroner’s Court within the building for private hire. 

Zerum is the planner and Stephan Levrant advised on heritage aspects. 

The project team also includes Pierce Hill as quantity surveyor, Curtins as civil and structural engineer, Crookes Walker advising on MEP, and Sandy Brown as acoustic consultant.

Law firm Kuits successfully obtained several new premises licences from Manchester City Council for the site, which will be used for future tenants to operate a variety of leisure offerings.

Your Comments

Read our comments policy here

Shame. The development of subterranean space with a glass pavilion atop is a good thing missed.

By Robert Fuller