Bellway Withington CGI

Bellway on site with Withington housing

Bellway Homes has started a scheme to deliver 74 homes on a site that was formerly part of the Withington Hospital estate in south Manchester.

The housebuilder is to deliver a mix of three and four-bedroom detached and semi-detached homes and two bedroom apartments. The development sits on Cavendish Road between Princess Parkway and the popular Burton Road area, close to the former main hospital site on Nell Lane since developed by PJ LIvesey.

The Bellway scheme will be branded as Eclipse. Louise Chamberlain, sales director at Bellway, said: “We’re delighted to have acquired this plot and are confident that the development will prove popular with families, first time buyers, young professionals and key workers looking for a high quality, low maintenance home in this highly desirable suburb with its great social scene and superb commuter links.

“We know that Eclipse will prove popular with those looking for their forever home as well as first time buyers. Bellway is especially keen to assist as many first purchasers as possible onto the housing ladder in such a key location by working in conjunction with the Government’s Help to Buy scheme.”

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Bet the WDRA are delighted.

By BC

Horrid pastiche…..Need higher density in what is more of an inner suburb…

By Schwyz

Glorious old buildings converted into flats, homes on any slight space, and the mass redevelopment of the former MMU campus with ‘homes aimed at the £1m mark’. Didsbury is heading in the wrong direction…

By Didsbury dweller

I’m guessing that the number of cars the future owners will bring have not been accounted for in the planning / design. The neighbouring new build estate on the former hospital is a nightmare – car parking is a nightmare.

By allotmentlad

What part of this image makes you think you are in Manchester? Haven’t they heard of context? Instead of rolling out the same design they used in other parts of the country Belway need to look at the local vernacular including the success of the contemporary scheme at Didsbury point. Also with so many people looking for homes in South Manchester the planners should be insisting on higher density for the many rather than luxury homes for the few.

By Jim McMillan

Dreadful and badly thought out scheme encompassing the most unimaginative and lazy architecture possible. Where are the two bed starter homes? Where is the uniqueness to Didsbury? Same sorry rubbish as blighting most of the country, harking back to the past rather than looking forward. Shame on you Manchester planners for approving such rubbish. Shame on you Manchester Council for not insisting on more. Shame on you Bellway for blighting our street.

By John Turner

Mostly shame on you Bellway – what’s lazy is always blaming the LPA. End of the day, its the developer building this dross.

By Rooney

Horrible pastiche development. Not what the area needs. Give us some quality modern homes, not old fashioned brick boxes with poky rooms and tiny windows.

By Didders

Place NW this is a lazy piece of reporting, the image does not accurately reflect what is being built.
Whilst we did not advise on this scheme, Bellway have approvals for an interesting materials palette. I like the roof pitches on the town houses, not pastiche. . .

By Urban designer

I blame the council as I bet they just sold the land to the highest bidder rather that the developer proposing what’s best for the local community

By Lucy

Urban Designer – do you work for Bellway? Are you even aware of what modern housing design encompasses? Open plan living, space and light, good storage, high density yet well thought out lines of sight giving greenery, privacy and parking. This development is old before its time however they choose to clad the bricks with ‘interesting materials’. Nothing but lazy architecture (if you can even call it architecture)!

By Didders

Lucy, when did the council own the land? You do know hospitals aren’t owned by local authorities, don’t you?

Besides which, blaming the planners for a hypothetical decision by the estates division (a service which is contracted out anyway) to sell to a particular developer isn’t fair. Developers get away with far too much in the current climate. LPAs have their hands tied enormously at the moment, we should hesitate before blaming them for everything.

By Rooney

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