The JV behind Parkside wants the industrial scheme to become a sustainability 'benchmark' for other projects in the region. Credit: via Merrion Strategy

Arup to craft sustainability strategy for £100m Parkside

“Parkside will become an exemplar of how to futureproof a large, complex project of this type,” said John Downes, chairman of the Parkside Regeneration joint venture between St Helens Council and Langtree.

Downes is also the group chief executive of Langtree. He added: “It is far from straight forward but Arup lead the field in this area and, with their help, we will deliver a project that matches economic and social value with environmental performance”.

The Parkside project is focused on redeveloping the site of the old Parkside Colliery, transforming it into an employment hotspot. The first phase of Parkside is underway, having achieved planning permission for 1m sq ft of industrial space. That phase is expected to complete in June 2024. Elsewhere at Parkside, Balfour Beatty is building a link road to connect the 230-acre site to Junction 22 of the M6.

Arup has been charged with working alongside the entire project team to find ways to improve the sustainability credentials of the project. This will go beyond Parkside’s current goal of achieving a BREEAM Excellent rating and impact everything from the project designs to materials palette to construction.

“Working with Langtree and St Helens Council is a tremendous opportunity to help them turn their passion for sustainability into practical solutions for this important development,” said Arup sustainable buildings associate Andy Sheppard.

“We’ll be using our expertise to help Parkside keep pace with increasing demand for sustainable design and operation from tenant organisations, employees and communities.”

Lisa Harris, chief director for place with St Helens Borough Council, emphasised the important role sustainability will play at Parkside.

“We’ll leave no stone unturned to find the optimal way to deliver the project and it will become a benchmark for other developments in the borough and Liverpool City Region,” she said.

“This activity fits with our plans in response to the council’s climate emergency declaration and will help to make our borough greener as set out in our St Helens Together Strategy and ensuring a green economic recovery.”

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What a refreshing approach. Raises the bar for the Omega extension, I’d imagine. Good on them.

By Sceptical

If this is true – where is the rail connection? The site is next to both the west coast main line and Liverpool-Manchester route. Or will the site be 100% reliant on diesel HGVs while we hope for a technical solution to turn up? In which case all the greenwashing in the world is worthless.

By Pete

@Pete As I understand it a further phase is being targeted for a strategic railfreight terminal.

By Railhead

“We’ll be using our expertise to help Parkside keep pace with increasing demand for sustainable design and operation from tenant organisations, employees and communities.”

Presumably this includes public transport and active travel linkages to the surrounding networks – and restricted car parking for employees and visitors?

By Prescotian

@Prescotian What would be great would be a brand new, dirty great big integrated bus and rail interchange right next to the site for all the workers to use.

Oh, wait: there is one…

By Train rider

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