125 Deansgate

Co-working operator set to take all of 125 Deansgate

Jessica Middleton-Pugh

Regus brand Spaces has agreed terms to take the entirety of Worthington Group’s 125 Deansgate, currently under construction in Manchester city centre.

Last year, fellow co-working operator WeWork was tipped to take 45,000 sq ft, but negotiations stalled during the Christmas period.

Spaces is now set to let the whole 116,000 sq ft office; previously, market rumours had suggested that the company was only looking to take half the building.

The Deansgate location represents an expansion for Spaces; the new office will be in addition to its other Manchester facility, Peter House.

Spaces was founded in the Netherlands, and was acquired by Regus in 2015 as part of the serviced office operator’s bid to compete with the rapid rise of WeWork.

Regus is owned by IWG, which in the financial year to June 2018 recorded a turnover of £1.2bn.

The agents at 125 Deansgate are Savills and Knight Frank.

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Still doesn’t detract from the fact this is an architectural crime.

By Acelius

@Acelius How?

By sherbert_lemon

Always good to read informed opinions. It’s a shame this one isn’t

By Redness

This is a great building, it actually makes Centurion house look better too, which I’m guessing was the intention.

By Dre

I don’t know, I quite like it! There’s way worse going up than this. Look at the Stockport flats in today’s articles for one!!

By Architectural Criminal

Acelius is a bore, constantly posting the same rubbish

By PFI

Great news, great building. Would be nice if some of the ground floor is left for retail though……

By ALL

Personally I think it is very respectful to John Rylands Library opposite, which is my favourite building in Manchester.

By DPM

This building in my opinion overpowers John Lyrands library and is less interesting than the previous building on this site. A poor relations to the excellent One St Peters Sq designed by the same architect.

By Lenny1968

By ALL .. the ground floor has been let to the ‘Church of Spice’.. you’ll see plenty of the congregation milling around outside once the building goes live ..

By Tony P

I think the crime here is not stepping it back more from the road. It’s the narrowest part of deansgate and there are wide pavements on either side, makes no sense to me.

In the previous building you were able to walk beneath the archways, so we’ve actually lost pavement :(

By Rob

You need to dig a little deeper guys. This is part of a package of schemes which will create a new space at Mulberry St, a square in front of the Hidden Gem and re-landscape brazennose st and Lincoln Sq. And it’s all happening. It’s called proper planning!!

By Redness

I think this is quite a nice simple building. It looks fine from the Deansgate Square end of Deansgate. Cities which look good are ones which have similar buildings in one street rather than a mish mash. The great Georgian terraces of Edinburgh for instance are almost identical and look stunning. The waterfront at Liverpool because everything is white, looks equally stunning. Even in Manchester we have Whitworth street with the amazing terracotta warehouses side by side. This is the reason why Axis looks an abomination on that site because it is surrounded by glass towers and it is covered in those horrible tiles.

By Elephant

We will never please elephant if he hankers so much for the past. The cladding system on axis is one of the most expensive to be used in the city. It changes in response to ambient conditions. You can’t please everyone o course but that is a very high quality material.perhaps we should set aside a zone for some Georgian town houses in 2019!

By Redenough

Redenough. You are right but the towns the Georgians built are nicer than the rubbish we have had since the war. Or would you rather live in Birmingham than Bath?

By Elephant

I have to live now and I think the choice is wider than Birmingham or Bath. I happen to think Manchester is amazing in so many regards. Too many people focus on what they haven’t got rather than what is under their noses. Glass half full and so on!

By Red enough

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