Leyland farington moss

Troubled Kier wins Leyland resi consent

PWA Planning has gained planning approval for 174 homes on behalf of Kier Living, within a larger development in Farington Moss.

The scheme, on a 16-acre plot off Croston Road, is part of a wider 350-home development for which the then Homes & Communities Agency secured outline consent in late 2014. Miller Homes is on site building its part of the development.

Paul Walton, director of PWA Planning, said: “We’re proud to be supporting Kier Living’s aspirations to create vital new housing in Lancashire.

“We’re witnessing strong demand for new homes in Preston and South Ribble as the City Deal continues bringing new investment and jobs to the area.”

Sue Warwick, regional director for Kier Living, said: “Croston Road represents a further step in Kier Living’s expansion in the North West, which has seen three new sites open in the last 12 months.”

The scheme will see a mix of two, three, four and five-bedroom homes created, including detached homes, townhouses and bungalows. It includes 27 homes for the affordable market.

The wider Kier group has been embattled over the last few months, struggling to find solutions to increasing debt problems. In June it announced it would sell off the residential arm Kier Living, along with facilities management and environmental services divisions,as well as reducing its stake in Kier Property.

Kier’s share price has since nosedived, with shares that had traded at around £10 in September 2018 dipping below £1 last week. Last week Kier Living’s executive director John Anderson left the business, which delivered more than 2,000 homes in 2018 and has a reported landbank of more than 4,700 homes.

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So.. 27 of 176 affordable housing. 150 unaffordable houses?

By Grottymonty

I know its getting hot but I’m sick of people like Grottymonty coming on here and immediately down playing the affordable homes (and other benefits) being provided by developers and suggesting everything that isn’t classed as affordable is unaffordable; its complete nonsense. The affordable provision is generally the product of a Council’s Development Plan policy which the developer adheres to and that policy comes from an evidence base that is tested at Examination. If the provision in a scheme isn’t in compliance with the policy then there will be a good reason for it. And those homes that don’t meet the definition of affordable aren’t unaffordable to all just a section of the community that’s why we have affordable housing policies in the first place so that those people who can’t afford the market rate have a chance of a home!!! And guess what simple mathematics reveals that if you build more open market homes and you’ll get more affordable ones and one day if we build enough homes to meet the country’s needs supply might meet demand and prices might come down but that of course is wishful thinking!!!!!!!

By WoundUp

My main concern for all is Kier!!! not how many units are affordable or not.

By CBA

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