Gallery Gardens
The JM Architects-designed scheme is the latest in the Manchester Gardens masterplan

PLANNING | DeTrafford’s Gardens scheme back on agenda

Chloé Vaughan

Following its deferral in February, DeTrafford’s latest Gardens scheme in Manchester, Gallery Gardens, is once more recommended for approval.

Manchester Metropolitan University’s application for a science faculty, and a mixed-use apartment-led scheme in Northenden are also expected to be approved by the city council on Thursday.

RECOMMENDED FOR APPROVAL 


Gallery Gardens 


DeTrafford Gallery Gardens Planning

Developer: DeTrafford

Architects: JM Architects and DEP

Planner: Paul Butler Associates

Design engineer: Civic Engineers

Height: Eight to 18 storeys

Apartments: 366

The £94m development is again recommended for approval after Cllr John Flanagan called for a site visit to inspect the road infrastructure and surrounding area at the previous committee meeting, deferring a decision on the scheme for a month.

DeTrafford’s scheme comprises two towers on a 41,000 sq ft site off Hulme Hall Road, Chester Road and Ellesmere Street. One block is stepped from eight to 12 storeys, the other from 14 to 18 storeys.

The residential offer provides a mix of one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments, while the ground floor includes 2,300 sq ft of commercial space.

This scheme would mark the fifth building in De Trafford’s Manchester Gardens masterplan, which has already seen the completion of Roof Gardens, while Sky Gardens, City Gardens and St George Gardens are all under construction.

Approval is recommended subject to a legal agreement being reached for a financial contribution towards off-site affordable housing.


MMU’s science faculty

MMU Science Campus

Developer: Manchester Metropolitan University

Architect: BDP

Planner: Turley

Consultant: Curtins

Height: Seven storeys

MMU’s plans to demolish its John Dalton West building and erect a seven-storey, 160,000 sq ft faculty of science and engineering are also tipped to receive planning consent.

The £45m building will include laboratories, including a 200-student ‘super-lab’, and seminar rooms to the south of the building. Offices and communal areas will be situated to the north.

John Dalton Tower is to be refurbished and re-organised as part of the plans and will connect to the building on the east side.

Subject to approval, the university will relocate the existing uses within the John Dalton West building this spring. The demolition of the building itself is expected to commence towards the end of this year or start of 2021, with construction of the new campus set to begin the following spring. Completion is projected for 2023.


Palatine Road, Northenden

Calderpeel Northenden Jan 2019

Developer: Gustav Bonnier

Architect: Calderpeel

Height: Four storeys

Apartments: 16

Manchester planning committee will also discuss developer Gustav Bonnier’s application for a four-storey building with 16 apartments and 2,500 sq ft of retail at the ground floor on Palatine Road in Northenden.

The site houses derelict units with apartments above them, which would be demolished to make way for the scheme.

The proposed building would be clad in a mix of grey-buff brick and a darker cladding around the upper floors.

Each of the 16 apartments, which are all two-bedrooms, would have its own car parking space to the rear of the proposed building, while the four apartments on the third floor are set back to provide space for a roof terrace.

The ground floor unit is being proposed for retail, café, or restaurant space with a terrace-style public realm.

Under Manchester City Council’s planning policy, the developer would normally have to designate three of the units as affordable, but an affordable housing statement filed with the planning application called for a lieu sum to be paid instead, as a housing association was thought to be “highly unlikely” to be interested in purchasing or managing the units.

The council has received 13 letters of objection to the scheme, which consider it too high for the surroundings, and too dominating. Three letters of support were also received, which highlight the importance of retailers for the local economy.

Your Comments

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The Detrafford scheme is too tall and should be reduced a few storeys and the Northenden scheme is terrible in every single way.

By Tyler

How can it be too tall? That’s stupid

By Dan

@Tyler there are other existing tower blocks in the area of similar height, in addition to the approved Arundel Street apartments.

By Aaron

Northenden? Whatever happened to context

By Architactical