Manchester Waters Phase Three, Peel L&P, P.Peel
A masterplan for the wider Pomona Island site is due next year. Credit: Peel L&P

Peel unveils next phase of Pomona Island 

Dan Whelan

A pair of buildings comprising 162 homes designed by AHR Architects is the next tranche of the 26-acre masterplan to come forward. 

A consultation on the project, which features a mix of one-, two- and three-bedroom apartments available for private rent, opens today and will run until 10 October.

Turley is advising on the planning application for the project, due to be submitted this autumn.

The scheme forms part of Peel L&P’s Manchester Waters development, which encompasses the whole of Pomona Island, a swathe of land that sits between the Bridgewater Canal and the Manchester Ship Canal west of the city centre, straddling Trafford, Salford and Manchester local authority areas.  

The two buildings will reach 12 and 14 storeys and are to be constructed on a plot next to Rowlinsons’ Pomona Wharf development, which completed in 2017.  

Manchester Waters Phase Three 2, Peel L&P, P.Peel

AHR Architects designed the project. Credit: Peel L&P

James Whittaker, Peel L&P’s executive director of development said: “We’re excited to be bringing forward the latest proposals to deliver much-needed high quality homes to rent on this well-located brownfield site.   

“The principle of the development is to regenerate the vacant site and create a sustainable community that can thrive within a peaceful setting on the waterfront.” 

An outline planning application for the development of the wider Pomona Island is being prepared and is expected to be submitted in 2022.  

A project team comprising Jon Matthews Architects, planning consultant Turley and landscape architect Exterior Architecture, is formulating the long-awaited formalised masterplan.  

Earlier phases of Manchester Waters include two X1 developments totalling 742 apartments. 

Phase one, two buildings of nine- and 10-storeys, completed last year, while the next phase, three buildings ranging from 14- to 18-storeys, is under construction. 

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Wow, truly uninspiring.

What’s the point in the Pomona master plan next year if they’ve already built a load of dross all over it?

By .

A waste of a wonderful resource. This could have been a world class destination. All that land in a city desperate for green space,with water and wildlife already available, turned into Miles Platting in 1975.

By Elephant

At least they have balconies…

By Meeseeks

Tiny balconies overlooking the city’s most important visual landmark. Who needs to have dinner outside with views of the river eh.

By Jo

The concept of infinity was created by the ancient Greeks to describe how many times nicer this design is than the awful monstrosity that is currently being built at Pomona. Thankfully it seems we can learn from our mistakes.

By Maths Wizz

Talk about lost opportunities with this site

By Anonymous

What is it with tiny balconies or no balconies in so many of these proposals?

By MrP

Pomona Island has the potential to be very special, one of the last blank canvases in the city. Going on the current and proposed builds so far this is going to be a massive wasted opportunity. If only a developer like Capital and Centric or Renaker had it. The planning committee should be very strict on what happens here and this is where their energy should be focused, rather certain office blocks along Deansgate.

By Bob

More utter dross from Peel Holdings!

Imagine owning Pomona, on the city centre doorstep, having a blank canvas, and being in a position to invite some the best architects in Manchester, the UK, and the world to draw up a masterplan and individual building designs for Pomona, but this is the best Peel Holdings can come up with again, after their first breeze block and woeful apartments blocks.

Go to Hamburg, Copenhagen, etc, and see how they’ve developed their waterfronts properly.

By John Berta

I notice there are quite a lot of people walking and cycling in the artist’s impression. Does that mean they are going to remove the fence at Pomona Wharf blocking pedestrians and cyclists from the rest of Pomona Island? Needs to be a through route again, at least for those two modes

By Disgruntled Goat

Pomona has been a wasteland for the last 35/40 years. The Peel Lot bought it in the mid 1980s and is now building appartments on the site which is good news.

By Darren Born Bred.

If a block or development is above a certain size, the entire ground floor should be units for cheap rent instead of all the nonsense S106 agreements. They could be all manner of things that aren’t included from doctors, dentists, pharmacies, community space, gyms, pop-up shop space, art venues, nurseries, even schools. Else the places are soulless. It’s as though it’s deliberate, the equivalent of vertical sprawl.

By John L