Marriott, Cornbrook, P.Leach Rhodes Walker
The £43m scheme will be developed by a joint venture between Bricks Group and Peel L&P. Credit: Leach Rhodes Walker

Manchester approves £43m Marriott despite Hulme concerns 

Dan Whelan

Hulme councillors opposed the double hotel project, citing concerns about the impact the construction of the project could have on local residents. 

However, Manchester City Council’s planning committee voted to approve the application, which will see the creation of a 154-bedroom hotel and an 88-bedroom aparthotel, to be operated by Marriott under its Courtyard brand. 

“We don’t agree with the idea of this area being a gateway into the city centre,” Hulme ward councillor Annette Wright said. 

“This is Hulme ward, it is a residential area and I am sure some of the planning committee are tired of hearing the same thing for me but every time one of these blocks is proposed we get the same objections and fears raised by residents.” 

These fears are over the “gentrification” of the area, Cllr Wright said, as well as the impact of construction activity on residents. 

The £43m hotel plan, being brought forward by Bricks Group and Peel L&P, is part of a hybrid application that included full consent for Glenbrook’s 280-apartment Vox development. 

That application was approved in 2018 and featured outline consent for the hotel development. Vox completed last year. 

Bricks Group and Peel L&P submitted a reserved matters application for the part 11-, part 15-storey hotel project in July.  

Leach Rhodes Walker is the architect for the scheme. Avison Young is the planning consultant.   

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Councillors really are utterly stupid and deluded at times! Well done to the planning committee for seeing sense. I think those Councillors should be more concerned about the design of the buildings rather than anything else!

By Steve

Here we go again this council don’t care, but only about income. Instead of invest in the youth developments in the area which Hulme is lacking at the moment. The library close, youth centres close the park on the football ground is not been look after for years.

By Anonymous

What’s wrong with it, those councillors need to wise up and realise a good thing when they see it!

By John Small

And so another building being erected in our local area, waiting to hear outcome of another proposed erection of apartments on site if old Game Cock building, building Cambridge St. On site of Church Inn. New blocks nearly full between Stretford Rd and Bonsall St. Hey do you know that us residents have to live here , in the middle of all this, and it’s very difficult, why are we not considered, this is our home area not passing through as most are. We are not given a second thought me I have lived her since 70s but you have taken the heart out of our community , but hey what does that matter when mega bucks involved, shame on you.

By Maria Finnegan

All we hear about are these fancy private investment projects. Where is the affordable housing for us folks that voted you in? Manchester City Council has sold it’s soul to ‘developers’.

By Yvonne McCalla

Please stop covering every inch of space in Manchester with concrete buildings. All views out are gone. Just monstrosities everywhere.

By Stella Beirne

A very narrow-minded view from the Hulme ward councillor. It will benefit so many attractions and the area. Football, cricket, Salford Quays, Victoria Warehouse and with access from Cornbrook straight to the city she should be championing this.

By Andrew

No, it’s not a ‘residential’ area, it’s an inner-city neighbourhood. Go to any proper city around the world and the neighbourhoods directly surrounding the city centre, and they are lively, bustling mixed neighbourhoods, with high density, residential, retail, businesses, rapid transit and yes, hotels. Manchester is the weird one where the city centre just ends and then there is nothing. This is just bringing the city back up to what is standard around the world (and a positive standard). If people want pure residential neighbourhoods, move out to the far flung suburbs

By Joe

@Steve, @Andrew – the councillors are there to represent the views of residents, not to represent the interests of developers, or attractions etc. Why should a councillor for Hulme ward be interested in how this development will benefit Salford Quays or Victoria Warehouse?

It’s not narrow minded for people to care about the areas they live in more than the grand overarching plan for the entire city.

By Anonymous

This is amusing to read. God help this city grow if this continues to be the approach. Ever was this.

By Noddy

It’s across a major road on the edge of a district with limited young people on the site of derelict buildings. Yes, Hulme may well need investment but this isn’t in Hulme, it’s barely in Castlefield. I suspect half the commentators aren’t aware what spot it will be taking up.

By Allotmentlad2

Get it built. It is almost as if these councilors don’t want investment in their area. Where do they think the money and jobs come from? My experience with a lot of the councilors in Manchester
is that they are always quite happy to complain about development but rarely sort out some of the real issues in their community. I suppose its far easier to just hammer central government over lack of money isn’t it.

By Bob

Hulme ward covers land all the way over to Upper Brook Street and covers most of MMU and UoM – hardly all residential.

By Bradford

Another revolting decision by MCC. I’m with the ward cllrs on this one.

By Observer

It’s quite funny these comments. A brownfield inner city site, in the second largest economy in the UK undergoing rapid redevelopment and growth, bringing jobs and a boost to the economy, and people object. I’m that dumbstruck by the ignorance of some of the comments I don’t know what to say…

By MB