Cruise Terminal Image

Liverpool invites tenders for cruise terminal

Liverpool City Council has gone out to tender for a lead advisor and multidisciplinary technical team to consult on the design and development of a new permanent cruise liner terminal at the former Princes Jetty off Princes Parade.

The council is looking to explore how a new, larger terminal could replace the current facility at the Pier Head, which opened in September 2007. A feasibility study was completed earlier this year by a team led by Arup. The value of the contract is estimated at a minimum of £2m.

The new terminal would sit just 300m down-river and would be able to handle turnaround cruises with up to 3,600 passengers. It is envisaged that a two-storey building would be built on reclaimed land on the River Mersey. A new quay wall would be created and changes made to Princes Parade to allow coaches to drop off and pick up passengers.

The facility would include a new passenger and baggage terminal, passport control, lounge, café, toilets, taxi rank, vehicle pick-up point and a car park.

Since Liverpool became a turnaround facility in 2012, the number of vessels visiting the city has doubled from 31 a year to 63. Passenger numbers are up from 38,656 four years ago to almost 79,000 this year plus 35,000 crew, generating a visitor spend of £7m.

Liverpool was recently named the UK’s best port of call for the third time in four years by review site Cruise Critic, and won Destination of the Year at the Seatrade Cruise Global industry awards in September 2015. This year it welcomed Disney Cruise Line to the UK.

Joe Anderson, mayor of Liverpool, said: “Liverpool’s cruise industry has blossomed over the past decade helping to transform the tourism appeal of Liverpool and give the Mersey a new lease of life. It has been one of the city’s great success stories but we’re now at the stage where we need to relocate if we are to welcome the next generation of super-liners.”

Working with Princes Jetty owner Peel, the council are also carrying out further maritime and infrastructure investigations, impact assessments and surveys.

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