McCauls OMI Laystall Street
The listed building will contain offices and apartments alongside

Laystall Street plans lodged

Neil Tague

Developer McCauls plans to create 89 homes and 8,000 sq ft of workspace at the grade two-listed 32-34 Laystall Street, just off Manchester’s Great Ancoats Street.

Designed by OMI Architects, the plans will see the restoration of the 1879 building into commercial space. The building was initially constructed as the offices, showroom and workshops of John Armitage & Son’s terracotta and fireclay manufacturing company.

The building will be extended to the corner of Laystall Street and Pigeon Street, “with a contemporary addition to provide a new vertical circulation system for the building”.

To the rear of the showroom, the intention is to build a nine-storey residential development configured in a horse-shoe around a landscaped courtyard. Deloitte is advising on planning, with Stephen Levrant Heritage Architecture also on the team.

This is the third McCauls project in the city centre, the developer also working with OMI on the delivery of Warehaus Ancoats, also a blend of renovation and new build.

Director Joe McCaul said: “Having worked closely with OMI Architects, Deloitte and Manchester City Council we are delighted to bring forward plans to breathe new life into the old showroom by creating a unique office space within the listed building and create new homes at the rear of the site.

“There is also exciting regeneration planned around the Piccadilly Basin area and we look forward to playing our part in this.”

Other developments advancing in the area include Capital & Centric’s Leonardo hotel in Adair Street and Urban Splash’s last plots at New Islington.

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The building in question is stunning and has long been a rotting gem. I am not sure about the additions. It is better than nothing.

By Elephant

Should get buit. 9 storys is about right for the population density of the wider area.

By Robert Fuller

Great design and very sensitive to its surroundings. Love the old mixed with the new

By Steve

Looks like a very sensitively planned scheme-well done!

By Adam Ash