Carrington Gateway Himor May 2018

Himor aims for autumn start on Carrington Gateway

Charlie Schouten

Developer Himor is pushing ahead with its plans for a major redevelopment of the former Shell refinery in Carrington after it submitted a reserved matters application for nearly 220,000 sq ft of industrial space at the site.

The developer’s application, supported by architect AEW and planner Spawforths, is for six buildings at a gateway site in Carrington covering nearly 19 acres. Dubbed Carrington Gateway, this area sits at the end of the A1 just off Manchester Road.

The northern part of the site is currently occupied by a builders’ merchant yard and by Basell Polyolefins UK.

The six buildings range in size with one at 98,000 sq ft significantly larger than the others. The remaining five vary in size between 34,000 sq ft and 10,000 sq ft. If the application for the site is approved, Himor is aiming to start on site in the autumn.

The application follows the approval of a hybrid application for the wider site which was secured in August last year.

This includes up to 725 homes, as much as 500,000 sq ft of industrial and employment space, and 10,000 sq ft of retail. The residential and retail elements are outlined for the East of the site while the majority of the employment space will be to the West.

Construction of the residential element of the scheme is pencilled in for an early 2019 start date, with Himor working with Wainhomes to build the houses.

Carrington Gateway Himor May 2018 2

Six industrial units range between 100,000 sq ft and 10,000 sq ft

The professional team on the project also includes Arup and Tyler Grange, while Lexington Communications has led on public consultation.

Himor’s plans for the area have been subject to a legal battle with rival developer Peel, which called for a judicial review into the planning consent last year.

Peel raised issues over the the Western Gateway Infrastructure Scheme, a £32m package of road building and improvements currently under construction. A condition of Peel being granted consent for its 50-acre mixed-use Trafford Waters, and the 250-acre Port Salford, a mega-logistics scheme, was that Peel make a contribution to funding Western Gateway, along with Salford City Council and the Government.

Peel believes that Himor should also be asked to contribute to road improvements in the area, as vehicles accessing Carrington will benefit from Western Gateway, and that the development should be subject to the same phasing plan put on it for Trafford Waters. Peel lodged a detailed objection with Trafford Council in March 2017 and, following the decision to grant Himor planning permission, has pursued legal action since.

However, Peel’s application for a judicial review into Trafford Council’s decision was dismissed by the High Court, which also awarded £15,000 of costs against Peel.

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