City mayor of no benefit to Manchester, says LEP

An elected 'city mayor'' would not be in the best interests of Manchester according to the Greater Manchester Local Enterprise Partnership.

The body has outlined its position as part of the Government's consultation on directly elected city mayors which ended on January 3.

In a report prepared for the LEP last month, Manchester City Council chief executive Sir Howard Bernstein said any significant changes to governance at the city level could distract from the, "balance between city regional accountability and neighbourhood delivery".

In a statement the LEP said an elected mayor would "bring no advantages" and "does not align with the governance structures already in place across Greater Manchester". The LEP also believes it would not enhance economic growth.

Mike Blackburn, chair of the GMLEP, said: "We're currently in dialogue with the minister for cities on a 'city deal' which is focused on an agreement for Greater Manchester as a whole.

"The government's current proposals for a directly elected mayor for the City of Manchester alone do not align with this dialogue, which the GM LEP believes should be the focus of any discussion about further devolution of powers to Greater Manchester in support of economic growth.

"The LEP is also concerned that the Government's proposals as they currently stand conflict with the arrangements which have been driven and developed locally within Greater Manchester in response to Greater Manchester's particular opportunities and challenges."

A referendum on elected mayors will be held in May 2012.

Your Comments

Of course they are going to say that…it is not in their interests to have another nose in the trough


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