Church Street Ashton
The Church Street warehosue is to house 31 apartments. Image from Google

Ashton town centre apartments proposed

Neil Tague

Space formerly occupied by Marks & Spencer in the town centre could be redeveloped into 32 apartments, while a former warehouse in Church Street has been put forward for conversion.

Adar Investments is promoting the plans for the ex-M&S store. Abutting the Ladysmith shopping centre, the building faces onto Ashton-under-Lyne’s market square, across from the covered market and town hall. Poundland occupies the ground floor, but the upper floors have remained empty since M&S departed in 2011.

In a scheme designed by Prestwich-based Debtal Architecture, the develop proposes a shared rooftop garden for 18 one-bedroom and 14 two-bedroom apartments.

According to Debtal’s design & access statement, “the first and second floors are very long and wide and as the footprint was designed for a retail occupier, it does not easily suit a conversion into residential apartments.”

Part of its plan to innovate with the space, it said, is to create three courtyards within the scheme: “The proposal is to create large inner terraces/courtyards within the structure of the space, which will give natural light and private amenity space to the new apartments. The size of the new terraces will protect the privacy of neighbouring properties so no apartments will have windows that look directly into neighbouring properties.”

A short distance away in the town centre, at 4-10 Church Street, Manchester-based Real Estate Aventor, advised by Serviam Planning, intends to convert former warehouse space to 31 apartments – at this stage, 10 one-bedroom, 16 two-bedroom, with five yet to be confirmed. James Campbell Associates is the architect.

The schmes come foerward as Greater Manchester’s towns look to reposition town centre builings away from a focus on retail towards a more lifestyle-oriented offer, with Stockport being the most notably ambitious, with live schemes including the conversion of BHS and Glenbrook’s Stok, a redevelopment of the old M&S store.

Both applications have been lodged with Tameside Council, with a date yet to be set for determination.

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This is a good sign as it shows Manchester’s influence is gradually edging out to the surrounding towns. This proves more than ever the importance of extending the Metrolink and decent trains and buses.

By Elephant

They need a radial met route around the city region to free up capacity in the city centre and unlock the potential of the GM region.
But they need to move everything underground in the city centre first and give back some public realm.

By Anonymous

Not a nice view

By P

This is something l have said to myself, what are excellent idea. Thank you and good luck to the development company

By Shah

Fantastic utilising these beautiful old buildings which are part of Ashton’s history. Hopefully add to a more attractive town centre which has significantly declined and been in poor repair for many years time for the council’s to take pride in Tameside.

By Collette Ryan

I think Tameside council need to look at dropping rents on empty shops to encourage small business to open. The extortiate rents drove many way. If the intention is to replicate Manchester then better shops and nice restaurants would help. also more car parks.

By MollyMay

I agree with molly may, tameside council need to re think rents for those empty shops but also for the inside market. Before they did the outside market both inside and out was full of traders, now there’s nothing. If flats are to be built on previous M & S site, will there be parking, what kind of people will be living there? Before going ahead with these plans, the issue with inside and out needs to be a plan to tackle the issues in Tameside

By Missy